It’s fair to say that tiny homes are not a new thing particularly. In the wake of rising housing costs and people just interested in saving some money to create a practical and functional home on a shoestring budget, tiny living spaces are becoming increasingly popular. How do you feel about these tiny homes? Do you think there are just too many compromises involved?

If you are very much on the fence about tiny and small living spaces, the following post might change your mind. In it we are going to look at some of the most impressive examples we’ve found of small space living. Also, for more examples and techniques for improving your house, visit Utterly Home.

Glass Greenhouse – Catskills, New York State

With this tiny building, the first in our highlighted structures, you get a lot more natural light than we’d know what to do with. One of the designers on the television show Treehouse Masters, Christina Salway, has her own quaint little tiny home. 

The most intriguing thing about this property that is half greenhouse, half treehouse, are those 75+ windows that have been salvaged from various places, by Christina herself as well as friends and relatives too. https://www.nelsontreehouse.com/blog/glass-treehouse

The Fox House, Nashville

Don’t be mistaken into think that this treehouse is as small and lacking as it may appear from the outside. On the inside there is a home office space, a living room and even a bedroom. Curiously, it’s that last room, the bedroom, that the whole treehouse was based around. 

Rather than compromising on sleeping bags or makeshift beds, they used an iron bed from their main property’s guest room and simply incorporated the dimensions of it into the structure.

When the popular mommy bloggy Amanda Robinson, her husband and two sons wanted to escape life in the big city, they made the curious leap of switching out their huge family home to a farmhouse built in the 1940s that needed some TLC. In doing so, it would mean they lost around 1,100-sq-feet of living space. 

Although that sounds like anything short of a disaster, but they made it work and one of the keys to making tighter quarters feel part of the bigger home and thus making them feel more spacious was to use a single accent color in the whole of the home.

That meant no matter what part they are in, because there is a connector running through the home, it makes it feel bigger. https://www.countryliving.com/home-design/g1887/tiny-house/?slide=29

Tiny Home with Working Amp and Stage Area

This is perhaps the strangest, but also coolest tiny home we’ve come across. Designed and made for a violinist in the Trans-Siberian Orchestra, Asha Mevlana who needed a home that would provide her space to live and sleep, but most importantly, play music on the inside and outside. 

As you can see from the pictures, there is no doubt as to the capabilities of this tiny home. Especially when you discover that yes that is a real and working amp.

The decking, to the front rather than the back also functions as a stage. Perfect for any musician. That’s not all. On the inside, although it doesn’t look like it from the exterior, there is a comfortable amount of room. A bedroom, full shower and bathroom, and its thanks largely to the use of lots of window, the high ceilings and the garage-style door that let’s copious amounts of light in.

What’s more, the structure is made of two parts. The part with the giant-sized working amp can be used as a trailer and taken on the road.

The Nugget Tiny House 

Now we know what you’re thinking with the next property – a small shed doesn’t count as a house. True, this has an area of just 100-sauare feet, but it ingeniously has a kitchenette, bathroom and bedroom, all within its small frame and built on a single-axle trailer so it can be towed around, changing the backdrop of your home as and when you please. 

196-square-foot Tiny Home in Boise, Idaho

This next tiny home we want to highlight is the home of Macy and James Miller, Hazel their daughter and Denver their Great Dane. After designing it from the ground up, Macy had her home built onto a 24-foot flatbed trailer utilizing the help of family and friends. 

Again, because of lots of natural light being allowed to flow right in, it feels more spacious than it is. 

Lots of clever little tricks were used, such as hidden storage beneath the bed and above the pantry helped to make it feel big enough to hold everything they need. https://www.countryliving.com/home-design/g1887/tiny-house/?slide=49

Floating Tiny Home

How about the home featured in the pic above that floats on the water and only takes up 240-square-feet? It was made for Louisa and Foy Brown in Maine and comprised pontoons, plastic floatation tubes in the foundation.

This was towed out to see along with Styrofoam and then it was built into the cottage you see. Water from the lake is what provides the dwelling with water for the kitchen and shower, while solar lights, oil lamps and candles are used to light it up at night.